Translate The Complete Works of Thomas M. Kelly Blog

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Comments on the politics of the times


SUPER
Political Action 
Comedy:

"SUPER PAC"

A series of -ten+ minute plays 
by Thomas M. Kelly & Seamus O'Shea.
Comments on the politics of the times: in theatrical format.

Characters:  
WHAMor: Wobble Head Assemblage & Marketing Creator and Lord of the world of Political Wobble Heads®™, Barack ObamaPaul Ryan (where ever Mitt Romney & Paul Ryan wobble they wobble backward or side to side weaving and bobbing), Bill Clinton, Beebee Netanyahu, Bella Abzug, JFK, FDR, LBJ, HST, Sir Winston, Teddy Roosevelt, Sarah Palin, Hilary Clinton, Harry Reid, 
Joe Biden
Karl Rove, Anne Romney, Claire McCaskill, Clint Eastwood, Todd Akin. Gabriel Gomez, John Soltz, Rudy Giuliani, Stephanie Cutter, John Bolton, Reince Priebus, Jim DeMint, Bill Kristol, Donald Rumsfeld,  Dickie Cheeeney, John Huntsman,  Liz Cheeeney, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. (Any such as the establishment so chooses.)

Wobble Head Rules:
Wobble Heads have labels "Made in China" on their backside.
Wobble Heads do not walk, they wobble side to side, and turn in place by wobbling.
Only the head on all models of the Wobble Head moves.  The arms and legs are rigidly placed by their sides.
Mitt Romney
Wobble Heads are created by The Wobble Head Assemblage and Marketing, "WHAM" or "WHAMor" for short and staff of Wobble Head makers.
Set:
On a storage shelf labeled "Wobble Heads: Old and New" in the Wobble Head Warehouse Outlet.
No more than five actors on stage at one time.  All other Wobble Heads do not speak unless spoken to.

Paul Ryan
My plays are available for production. Without the permission of Thomas M. Kelly, in writing, no performance of his play(s) may be produced, performed or read, before an Audience, whether an admission fee is charged or not. A royalty fee must be paid, in advance, for every performance. Royalty fees, for amateur productions, are listed with each play. Professional productions must receive a Professional Royalty Quote from Thomas M. Kelly.  seamus.oshea@ymail.com  or  tddtheatre@aol.com  . 


Available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle edition 
ISBN-13: 978-1480055094 



ISBN-10:
1480055093 





or on my blog 

http://superpoliticalactioncomedy.blogspot.com/



Monday, December 10, 2012



Shorts & Shorters:  A collage of Monologues and Plays By Thomas M. Kelly
For an evening of entertainment.

Volume I 
Another Day In The Park
King of Soft
Alama Had a Baby
Be a Villain
The Man Had a Name
War is a Racket!
The Essence of Time
“Hello kids!”
The Purple Chair
The Red Notebook

Publisher: Thistle Dew Publishing
Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.

ASIN: B005LVPLKW


Shorts and Shorters:  A collage of Monologues and Plays By Thomas M. Kelly
For an evening of entertainment. 

Volume II 
Too Late to Waken
Garage Sale
I Heard That!

Publisher: Thistle Dew Publishing
Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.

ISBN-13: 978-1475054415






Extreme Unction
A play within a play by Thomas M. Kelly © 2006.

As part of the rehearsal process, the director, David/Danyha Khaliq, holds table talk sessions with a reading of the playwright’s notes, and partial readings of the play coupled with a bit of blocking to ‘flesh-out’ the characters and discover the strength of his actors. The actors switch roles through the table talk and four of the blocked readings. During this process he realizes more than he bargained for in the revelation of prejudice, avarice, discrimination, intolerance and bigotry: perfect for the requirements of the playwright, himself.  By the end of the play the group of disparate actors becomes a tightly knit, cohesive assemblage: an ensemble.







Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
ASIN: B009JVZAX8

Fana!
Fanaticism today, is not a nice word

A play by Thomas M. Kelly  © 2003.

Six Palestinian murder/suicide bombers have targeted a Tel-Aviv Culture Center.  In the four-story complex each bomber is assigned a floor to detonate himself, with the exception of the theater, which has two assigned bombers. 
 They are to explode in rapid succession for maximum effect: to bring the building down on the hundreds of gallery visitors, planetarium viewers, and the theater audience.  The explosions take place as planned except for one.  In the lower level, ten meters below street level only one of the bombers exploded as planned.  The sixth bomber fails to explode.  The bomber is instead trapped beneath the rubble and bodies of the victims.  Another survivor, a guard, (a black Jew reservist, a member of the Israel Defense Force), who, as a civilian is a Tel-Aviv University professor (of the Diaspora: the flight of the Jews and the Palestinians), finds the surviving bomber (unknown to him as a bomber).  The guard’s father is Jewish.  His mother is Muslim.  A third survivor is a playwright from India.  She is Hindu.  The three survivors in the lower level, the theater, spend their waiting hours justifying their lives and religions: one very honestly, the other deceitfully.  In a mental duel the three argue the rationale of murder/suicide bombings using the Qur’an and the Torah as authority.  The guard reveals that he is a ‘refusnik’ (a member of the IDF who has refused to participate in the defense of Israel, arguing that he cannot in good conscience, humiliate, harass and violate the dignity of the Palestinians).  For his conscientious position he is jailed, then placed on guard duty at the Center. The story fades to an interview at the newly decorated and furnished home of the suicide bomber, where his mother has revealed to the public that she has condoned and encouraged her son’s martyrdom.  Videotape made by a clandestine television station based in Lebanon reveals the preparations of her son’s martyrdom.  (A public relations piece for the cause of Allah.)  Two diverse, but surprisingly similar, religions are placed in a situation that has an ending that foretells the outcome of the centuries of wars caused by men trying to prove that their god is the right god.  Did anyone ever ask god?  The story ends with the martyr revealing his identity, the final collapse of the building, causing the subsequent remaining explosion, and fade to the Independent News Corporation (a IBC type news organization) broadcast viewed in the home of the mother.

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
ISBN-13: 978-1480044364





“…smile,
and smile,
and be a villain.”*
A dramatic play by Thomas M. Kelly © 2008.

*William Shakespeare:  Hamlet Prince of Denmark (Hamlet at I, v)

"My tables,--meet it as I set it down,
That one may smile, and smile, and be a villain.
O villain, villain, smiling, damned villain!"

Phil, a journalist turned novelist, turned playwright, turned near-do-well wanna-be stand-up comedian, agrees to take a comedy gig in Atlanta, Georgia, which gives Luci, his wife, a chance to visit her high school friend, Sara, and her husband of four years, Jerry.  They have arrived by train from New York City and will return via the sleeper train Sunday.  Upon their arrival Phil realizes that Sara is a ‘goldmine’ of material for his act.  He antagonizes and engages Sara in what appears to be playful confrontations, but all the while he is stirring the pot to gather material: until the situation turns dangerous.  Luci, an attorney with a successful family law practice in N. Y., discovers that Sara is trying to convince her to advise her and to take her case involving her legal fight with her former husband over the custody of their two boys, Jonah (7) and Elijah (5).  However, with Sara’s undiagnosed borderline personality disorder, which includes obnoxious attitude of superiority, narcissism, histrionics, fear of abandonment, and threatened suicides, she continues to create heated confrontations with the people whom she loves and needs.  Sara will not admit that she has a mental problem.  She abuses her credit accounts.  She has a history of drug and alcohol abuse.  She moves from one job to another (usually fired) to avoid process servers.  Jerry immerses himself in his computer programming company, refusing to participate in decision-making regarding their marriage, their lifestyle, and the maintenance of their house.  Luci refuses to help Sara.  Sara, in an effort to call attention to herself and get her way, takes the children in a contrived attempt to move out of state.  The end result is that when she feels she has lost control of the situation, she terrorizes and beats the children, and uses her husband’s pistol to finally commit the oft-threatened suicide.  Using Sara as the source of his material, Phil has revealed that he is also a borderline personality, but of a different sort.

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
ISBN-13: 978-1480054998 

Ba-Bang! or the end of an error!
A political cartoon play in two acts by Thomas M. Kelly, © 2006.

A group of powerful and influential men and women were greeted by Lord Jacob Rothschild at Waddesdon Manor, the ancestral home of the Rothschild banking family to discuss economic and political issues: The ultimate networking venue.  Waddesdon Manor is a Renaissance-style chateau in the undulating hills of Buckinghamshire.  For the purposes of this play, a black box theatre will do.  Among those invited is billionaire Warren Buffet, and the soon to be governor of California, Arnold Schwarzenegger.  Other notable guests included the President of the World Bank, James Wolfensohn, Chief Executive Officer of Nokia, Jorma Ollila, De Beers chairman Nicky Oppenheimer, Chief Executive Officer of the worlds largest food processing and distribution company, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the worlds largest research-based pharmaceutical company, Chief Executive Officers of major oil corporations, Chairman and Chief Executive Officers of major banking establishments and three unnamed guests, outside the meeting hall: “Jay”, “Que”, and “Dubya”.  The men, after the women are removed for disturbing the process, nominate one of the three unnamed guests to a very important position: the Presidency of the United States.  
They nominate ‘DUBYA’.  Bush.  DUBYA agrees on the condition that he make his presidential legacy by waging war against those countries throughout the world denying freedom and democracy to their citizens and that he be allowed to spread the word of God in those freedom deprived countrys with the exception that he leave certain countries alone (if they are ‘owned’ by his “moneyed buds”: He wants to be a ‘War President’.  They enthusiastically and supplicatingly agree.  At curtain, Scene Two, we find DUBYA trying to use his influence with GOD to help him with his legacy: his quest to spread freedom, liberty and Christianity throughout the world.  During his private prayer session he is visited by some of the worlds greatest thinkers, politicians, scientists, artists, etc.: CARL SAGAN, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, 

HARRY S. TRUMAN, CONFUSCIUS, JOHN F. KENNEDY, LEONARDO DE VINCI, MAHATMA GHANDI, ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER,
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, BARBARA JORDAN, GOLDA MIER  
and of course GOD.  [Unlike da Vinci’s “Last Supper”, which is contra to a Jewish Passover feast, I have included four women in the’surreal stage painting’: Eleanor Roosevelt (Mary Magdalene), Golda Mier (Sarah) and Barbara Jordan (Ruth).]  They were summoned by “GOD” to ‘fix’ DUBYA’s (Dubyaisms and all) leadership image.  A good politician must have a good image to sell his agenda and to buy his legacy for the world to remember.

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
ASIN: B009KLZD6Q

Mixville
A play in two acts by Thomas M. Kelly.  © 2009
 First of the "Mixville" series.
Thomas Edwin Mix (born Thomas Hezikiah Mix; January 6, 1880 – October 12, 1940) was an American film actor and the star of many early Western movies.  He made a reported 336 films between 1910 and 1935, all but nine of which were silent features.  He was Hollywood’s first Western megastar and is noted as having helped define the genre for all cowboy actors who followed.  Tom Mix was "the King of Cowboys" when the influence of his screen persona was seen in his approach to portraying cowboys.  He created the first “Mixville”.  Such was the influence on the life of JUBAL McCabe.  Are our old cowboy heroes really dead? Not according to Jubal "Tom Mix" McCabe.
Jubal McCabe is a happy-go-lucky, wanna-be cowboy movie star.  As a youngster he was a "little Tom Mix", cleaning out a nest of imaginary outlaws in the family backyard in typical Tom Mix fashion.  Those were the days of the popular dream: to grow up to be like Tom Mix.  His every word intonation and body movements are out of the old western movies of the early 20th century.  Jubal speaks in the dialect and jargon as seen in the onscreen ‘intertitles’ of the ‘silents’ and heard by characters in the ‘talkies’.  He has been building his own “Mixville” in his backyard in the southern California town of Victorville.
Aiyanna (Anna) Eskaminzim is Native American.  Her Jicarilla (hēkəˈrēə) Apache name, ‘Aiyanna’, means ‘eternal blossom’.  Eskaminzim means “big mouth”.  She has the patience of a saint and the psyche of a poet with a “big mouth”.
Darrell (Dare) Honeycutt is an itinerant house painter.  Oklahoma native, with an obvious ‘Okie’ dialect.
"Save yer pennies, kids. Yer in fer another adventure."

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
ASIN: B009L3SG26

Zen and the Art of Making Par
A full-length play in two acts by Thomas M. Kelly.  © 2004

Francis is a thirty-three year old Captain in the United States Marine Corps who will not admit that he suffers from post-traumatic stress syndrome. It is common for people who have been traumatized to develop medical and psychological symptoms associated with the experience.
Francis and his wife divorced before he was sent with his Marine unit to Iraq. She, an engineer, was sent by her company to Iraq to rebuild bridges. On her way to the airport just outside Baghdad, she was killed by an improvised explosive devise. On a leave from the Corps for rest and recuperation he travels to Scotland where he has made plans to meet a friend for a round of golf at the birthplace of golf: St. Andrews, the Old Course. His friend sends his regrets. Francis is left at the practice tee where he meets an eccentric old man, Donal'. On the first green they meet Santikaro, a blind East Indian traveler in search of truth.
The happenstance traveler, even though blind, is induced to become Francis' caddie. Santikaro finds fault with each of the two players golf games, and their lives. On the eighteenth green he disappears as nicely as he appeared. They are left to rediscover the way to a meaningful existence.

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
ASIN: B009M5K80G

"Hey, Mom. Tell Rod..."
A play in two acts by Thomas M. Kelly, © 2008

In the city of Seattle, Washington, Rodney and Maggie Smythe receive a message on Rodney's telephone answering machine from Maggie's son Danny by a former marriage, saying "Hey, mom, tell Rod I am coming home, see ya' soon.".  Danny and Rodney, step-son and step-father, have had a strained relationship since Rodney and Maggie were married.  The message sends Rodney and Maggie into hours of arguments, wild goose chases, unanswered questions and dead end situations.  They call airlines and Amtrak to find him and his family on their passenger lists. Unable to find them they decide to drive to the Amtrak Station to meet a train they think may be the one they are on, only to come up empty handed.
While they are off on this wild goose chase, Danny, Angelique and Danny Junior arrive at Rodney and Maggie's home, park their car in the garage and fall into bed exhausted.
Hours later Rodney and Maggie return home exhausted and saddened having not found them at the train station.
On his way to bed Rodney stumbles over the luggage left by Danny in the hallway. They hear a baby crying and decide to bring the "hungry" Danny Junior into the study for a visit. Minutes later Angelique screams from the bedroom. 
Why has Danny left a lucrative position in a large law firm in Los Angeles to return to university?

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
 ISBN: 9781452457789

Sunday, December 9, 2012


Liza!

A play in two acts by Thomas M. Kelly, © 2010

Liza!" is an adaptation of "Liza of Lambeth" (1897), 
a novel by W. Somerset Maugham, (1874-1965),

Although I am drunk and bad, be you kind.  
Cast a glance at this heart which is bewildered and distressed. 
 O God, take away from my mind my cry and my complaint.
Offer wine,... and take sorrow from my remembrance.
Offer wine...

The play's action covers a period of roughly four months, from August to November, 1887. Liza Kemp is an 18-year-old factory worker and the youngest of 13 children, now living alone with her aging and incompetent mother. Very popular with all the residents—both young and old—of Vere Street, Lambeth, she cannot really make up her mind as far as her love life is concerned. She very much likes Tom, a boy her age, but when he proposes to her she rejects him ("I don't love yer so as ter marry yer"). Nevertheless she is persuaded to join a party of 32 who make a coach trip (in a horse-drawn coach, of course) to a nearby village on the August Bank Holiday (A bank holiday is a public holiday in the United Kingdom or in Ireland. There is no automatic right to time off on these days, although the majority of the population is granted time off work or extra pay for working on these days, depending on their contract. The first official bank holidays were the four days named in the Bank Holidays Act of 1870) Monday. Some of the other members of the party are Tom; Liza's friend Sally and her boyfriend Harry; and Jim Blakeston, a 40-year-old father of nine who has recently moved to Vere Street with his large family, and his wife (while their eldest daughter, Polly, is taking care of her siblings). The outing is a lot of fun, and they all get, more or less, drunk on beer. On their way back, in the dark, Liza realizes that Jim Blakeston is making a pass at her by holding her hand. After their arrival back home, Jim manages to speak to her alone and to steal a kiss from her.
Seemingly without considering either the moral implications or the consequences of her actions, Liza feels attracted to Jim. They never appear together in public because they do not want the other residents of Vere Street or their workmates to start talking about them. One of Jim Blakeston's first steps to win Liza's heart is to go to a melodramatic play with her on Saturday night. Afterwards, he succeeds in seducing her, although we never learn where they do it... obviously in the open.
But in the end they do "slide down into the darkness of the passage".
When autumn arrives and the nights get chillier, Liza's secret meetings with Jim become less comfortable and more trying. Lacking an indoor meeting place, they even spend their evenings together in the third class waiting room of a railway station. Also, to Liza's dismay, it turns out that people do start talking about them, in spite of the precautions they have taken. Only Liza's mother, who is a drunkard and a very simple sort of person, has no idea what is going on.
Liza's friend Sally gets married, has to stop working at the factory because her husband would not let his wife earn her own money, and soon becomes pregnant. Liza feels increasingly isolated, with Sally being married now and even Tom seemingly shunning her, but her love for Jim keeps her going. They do talk about their love affair though: about the possibility of Jim leaving his wife and children ("I dunno if I could get on without the kids"), about Liza not being able to leave her mother because the latter needs her help, about living somewhere else "as if we was married", about bigamy -- but, strangely, not about adultry.

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
ISBN: 9781452436791

On the Line

A play in two acts by Thomas M. Kelly.  © 2008

This is a play about Timothy 'Timmo' O'Connor O'Leary.   'Timmo' is a street attorney.  He is a sole practitioner because straight out of law school, 40 years ago, he couldn't find anyone who wanted to practice with him. 
"Why?", you ask.  Could it be that he is overweight?  Doesn't make a good physical presentation because he always looks as if he owns one suit (He actually owns two.) and looks as if he'd just awakened from a deep turbulent sleep in it (He did and has for the past week?  Could be.  
His housekeeper, Geraldine, hasn't seen him in over a week.  Otherwise she would have grabbed it and had it cleaned and pressed.  (Or thrown away.)  
Could it be that he drinks too much? Could be. (He always has something near to "warm" him.)  Could it be that he knows more about criminal law (and will tell you so) than any other attorney in town?  Could be. 
Could it be that he knows more about our Constitution and how the protects his client?  Could be. 
 Could it be that he always seems to have but one client at a time?  And that the presiding judges seem to keep him busy as court appointed attorney for the most needy, despite Timmo's eccentricities, his habits, his weaknesses, his dependencies, his attire, his temperament, his character, or is it because no other lawyer would take the case?  You be the judge.

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
 ISBN: 9781452449180

Pawns are but Poor Men

A play in two acts by  Thomas M. Kelly, © 2006

 In the summer of the year 2006, a team consisting of two men and two women discover a serum to stop the aging process for an undeterminable period.  The group knows the power of their discovery:  If the government or the drug industry finds the formula they will either keep the discovery secret or use it to their advantage. The group agrees to test the formula on themselves to prove that it works.  
Although it is a longstanding legal precedent in the United States of America that chess games cannot be copyrighted.  They are a gift to the world composed by the players who played them.  Nevertheless, it is with sincere gratitude that I thank the founders of Chessgames.com for the use of their web site in writing this play. 
Chessgames.com is a combined effort among several south Florida chess players, including Alberto Artidiello, Daniel Freeman, and the talented staff at 20/20 Technologies.  20/20 Technologies, has been providing innovative and custom Internet solutions since 1995. They are dedicated to serving all of your Internet presence needs.  They specialize in web design, graphic design, database development, and custom programming.

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
ISBN: 9781452407302

Ole' Gimlet Eye

A play in two acts by Thomas M. Kelly, © 2004

Smedley Darlington Butler was born in West Chester, PA on July 30, 1881. Over his father’s objections, but with the help of his mother, at the age of 16 he left home and enlisted in the United States Marine Corps. He was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in 1898, just 38 days short of his 17th birthday. He was promoted to Brevet Captain for his heroic action during the Boxer Rebellion in China in 1900. Thus began a career that lasted 33 years from the Spanish American War, through World War I, and through the second Chinese rebellion that set the stage for communist rule later in China. He became one of only two Marines ever to hold double awards of the Medal of Honor. After retirement he became one of the most popular speakers and fighters for veteran’s rights and the defeat of what is now referred to as the “military industrial complex”. In the 1930’s he revealed to President Theodore Roosevelt a scheme by a conglomerate of financiers, bankers, and industrialists to replace him with a “Presidential Assistant”, and he, Butler, appointed as the new “Dictator”.

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
ISBN: 9781452431079


Frankie and Johnny were Schweethawts
A play in two acts by Thomas M. Kelly, © 2006 

Frankie and Johnny were sweethearts, 
oh lordy how they could love.
They promised to be true to each other, 
just as long as there were skies above.
He was her man, and wouldn't do her wrong
Johnny said "I'm gonna leave you, I won't be gone very long".
You wait right here honey, don'cha ya worry none while I'm gone.
I am your man, and wouldn't do you wrong. 
Frankie went down to the barroom, she went for a bucket of beer.
"Hey there Mr. Bartender has my lovin' Johnny been here?
He is my man and wouldn't do me wrong" 
"Well I wouldn't want to cause you no trouble, but I ain't gonna tell you a lie.
Johnny left here about a minute ago, with that lowdown Nelly Bly.
He is your man, but he's been doin' you wrong."
Frankie went lookin' for Johnny, she didn't do it for fun.
She sneaked right up behind the Sheriff, and pinched his forty four gun.
He was her man, but he was doin' her wrong.
Johnny he grabbed off his Stetson, "Oh lordy don't shoot".
But Frankie had her finger on the trigger, and the gun went rooty toot toot.
She shot him down, 'cause he was doin' her wrong.
Roll me over easy, roll me over so slow.
Roll me over on my left side, 'cause the bullet hurts me so.
I was your man, but I was doin' you wrong."
Frankie ran over to Johnny, she knelt down on her knees.
"Oh lover forgive me, forgive me if you please
'cause you were my man but you were doin' me wrong."
This story got no moral, this story got no end.
It only goes to show you, that there ain't no good in men.
He was her man and he was doin' her wrong.


Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
ISBN: 9781452430058

Saturday, December 8, 2012


"Save yer pennies, kids." 
A play in two acts by Thomas M. Kelly, © 2011

 ACT I, Scene One
[JUBAL, wearing the regalia of an avid Tom Mix fan of the mid-twentieth century, from boots to chaps to ‘arrow’ shirt to his ‘Tom Mix’ hat, is at the door to his garage/museum, strumming and singing a cowboy ditty from “Along Came Jones” with Gary Cooper 1945, “Ole’ Joe Clark” singing to tourists.]
JUBAL
Ah wisht Ah had me a sweetheart, I'd set her on the shelf.  
And every time she'd smile at me , Ah'd get up there myself.
Fare thee well, Old Joe Clark,  Fare thee well, Ah say 
Fare thee well, Old Joe Clark.  It’s time ta’ say g’day 
Ol’ Joe Clark ‘ee ’ad a wife, ‘n’ she was seven feet tall,
She slept wi’ ‘er head in the kitchen, ‘n’ ‘er big feet in the hall.
Fare thee well, Old Joe Clark.  Fare thee well, Ah’ll say 
Fare thee well, Old Joe Clark.  Now Ah I'll be on ma’ way
[JUBAL sets the guitar down and talks to the tourists/audience.]
…so ya’ see folks …cowpokes were on the Western movie scene as early as nineteen ought four with Tom Edison’s “Brush Between Cowboys and Indians”.  A’fore that most of a’ the movies showed native Americans and the lone frontiersmen as the heroes.  Ya’ all ‘member James Fenimore Cooper’s “Last o’ tha Mohicans”?  …‘N’ by the by…..  those natives weren’t Mohicans, they called themselves Mohe-gans.  That’s with a gee... not a cee  …[Pause.]…  Well, ta’ continua’.  Like Cooper’s heroes, Natty Bumppo, a white man, his Mohegan brothers Chin-gotch-gook and Uncas, …after they done did their good deed, ….they always returned to the wilderness.  Our movie cowpoke hero began with “Broncho Billy ‘n’ the Baby” featurin’ Gilbert M. "Broncho Billy" Anderson as a outlaw.  Ya’ see he saved the day for a baby… so the baby’s parents reformed "Broncho Billy" ta’ the way o’ the bible.  

V.O.  [Interrupting.]
And Jesus said unto them, "Truly I say to you, unless you are converted and become like children, you will not enter the kingdom of heaven."

JUBAL
Yes, uh... thank ya’, sir, but Ah’ dohn think “Broncho Billy” was converted, he was found and reformed.  Now since he was reformed, he couldn’t go on back to outlawin’.  ‘Specially in the wilderness.  ‘Cause in the wilderness there was nobody ta’ outlaw agi’n.  So he decided to stay on.  He was what the town folk wanted: [JUBAL acts these out.] a man good with a gun… good with his fists, fearless in the face of evil, ...

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.
ISBN: 9781452471129

Friday, December 7, 2012

Sacred Ground
A play in two acts by  Thomas M. Kelly, © 2011

The Fabulous Tom Mix: Thomas Edwin Mix, born Thomas Hezikiah Mix; January 6, 1880 – October 12, 1940, was an American film actor and the star of many early Western movies.  He made a reported 336 films between 1910 and 1935, all but nine of which were silent features.  He was Hollywood’s first Western megastar and is noted as having helped define the genre for all cowboy actors who followed.  Tom Mix was "the King of Cowboys" when the influence of his screen persona was seen in his approach to portraying cowboys.  He created the first “Mixville”.  Such was the influence on the life of Jubal McCabe.  Are our old cowboy heroes really dead?  Not according to Jubal "Tom Mix" McCabe.  "Save yer pennies, kids. Yer in fer another adventure."

Mixville
This is a play about Jubal "Tom Mix" McCabe. Jubal is a happy-go-lucky, wanna-be cowboy movie star.  As a youngster he was a "little Tom Mix", cleaning out a nest of imaginary outlaws in the family backyard in typical Tom Mix fashion.  Those were the days of the popular dream: to grow up to be like Tom Mix.  His every word intonation and body movements are out of the old western movies of the early 20th century.  Jubal speaks in the dialect and jargon as seen in the onscreen ‘intertitles’ of the ‘silents’ and heard by characters in the ‘talkies’. He has been building his own “Mixville” in his backyard in the southern California town of Victorville.  Aiyanna Eskaminzim, a return visitor to Mixville is a Native American. Her Jicarilla (hēkəˈrēə) Apache name, ‘Aiyanna’, means ‘eternal blossom’.  Eskaminzim means “big mouth”. She has the patience of a saint and the psyche of a poet with a “big mouth”. She has come back to rebuild Jubal's "Injun village". We'll see 'bout that!

Available in paperback and Kindle edition on Amazon.

ISBN: 9781452475882